A month of winter songs

Songs for Christmas have been done. I’ve done it. I don’t want to do it again. There’s more to the season than the one holiday.

         Simon & Garfunkel – A Hazy Shade Of Winter

                                      Nico – Winter Song

                                                                          Pixies – Winterlong

Mumford & Sons – Winter Winds

                                                                          Tori Amos – Winter

                                   Steve Miller Band – Winter Time

Linda Ronstadt – Winter Light

                       Queen – A Winter’s Tale

Bruce Springsteen – Winter Song

               The Rolling Stones – Winter

                                           The Waterboys – Winter Winter

                                Of Monsters And Men – Winter Sound

Gordon Lightfoot – Song for a winter’s night

                              Rodney Crowell – Forty Winters

                                                  The Pipettes – A Winter’s Sky

                                      Cowboy Junkies – Winter’s Song

Dishwalla – Winter Sun

                              Blondie – Winter

                                            Big Country – Winter Sky

                        Nazareth – Winter Sunlight

Grand Funk Railroad – Winter and my soul

                 Engelbert Humperdinck – Winter world of love

                                    Hank Williams – Faded love and winter roses

Merle Haggard – Roses In The Winter

                                              The Staves – Winter Trees

Missy Higgins – Blind Winter

Said The Whale – The Bones of Winter

  Harry Chapin – Winter Song

                       Shawn Colvin – In The Bleak Mid-Winter

                                          U2 – Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Baroque December

I have no formal education in music, just a keen interest. Anything I know about classical music I have gleaned myself over time, and I’m learning as I go.

The Baroque era was an early part of that self-lead musical discovery. Many works of classical music that I encountered early in my adulthood came out of the Late Baroque period.

The Baroque was both a long and significant era in western music.

It’s broken into three parts, conveniently named early (1550–99), middle (1600–49), and late (1650–99), with 50 transitional years on either end to stretch the entire era to 250 years. Modern composition styles that many would most easily identify as classical music, like the concerto, sonata, and symphony, originate in this period. Given the length and influence, I feel like the Baroque deserves it’s own blog series, separate from other classical music.

Below are some December born or baptized Baroque era composers whose works I’ve come across.

EARLY

Orlando Gibbons

Agostino Agazzari

Christoph Demantius 

William Croft as a choirboy, by Unknown artist, painting, circa 1690

Orazio Vecchi

Manuel Cardoso

Alessandro Piccinini

Michelagnolo Galilei

Henry Lawes

MIDDLE

Adam Drese

Johann Rudolph Ahle

Samuel Capricornus (born Samuel Friedrich Bockshorn)

Bernardo Pasquini

Johann Adam Reincken (also Jan Adams, Jean Adam, Reinken, Reinkinck, Reincke, Reinicke, Reinike)

Tomás de Torrejón y Velasco 

LATE

Johann Krieger

William Croft

Domenico Sarro (also Sarri)

Francesco Geminiani

  • 12 Concerti Grossi, 1/2 & 2/2

Capel Bond

Antonio Soler 

Daniel Eberlin (transition period)

Michel Pignolet de Montéclair

Francesco Scarlatti

Johann Christoph Bach

Lodovico Giustini (transition period)

Michel Richard Delalande (or de Lalande)

Joseph Bodin de Boismortier

Giovanni Battista Somis

André Campra

Louis-Nicolas Clérambault

Giuseppe Valentini

Conrad Friedrich Hurlebusch

 

 

November earworm round up

I wake up almost every morning with an earworm. Sometimes they fade quickly, other times they last for days. Sometimes they make me happy, sometimes they make me doubt my own sanity. They come from all genres. I can never figure out what triggered them. The only thing I do know and that they do without fail is reinforce my belief that all music is connected and good music never goes out of style.

Here’s a roundup of my November earworms:

Sophie B. Hawkins – Damn I Wish I Was Your Lover

Dee Clark – Raindrops

Buckwheat Zydeco – Tee Nah Nah

Tina Turner – We Don’t Need Another Hero

John Hammond – 16 Shells From a Thirty-Ought Six

Johnny Rivers – Poor Side of Town

k.d. lang – Miss Chatelaine

Tom Tom Club – Genius of Love

Tom Fogerty – Sick And Tired

Rickie Lee Jones – Young Blood

Gordon Lightfoot If You Could Read My Mind

Jimi Hendrix – Hey Joe

Bonnie Raitt – Something To Talk About

Minnie Riperton – Lovin’ You

Randy Newman – You’ve Got A Friend In Me

LuLu – To Sir With Love

Donna Fargo – The Happiest Girl In the Whole USA

Peter, Paul and Mary – Leaving on a Jet Plane

Petula Clark – A Sign Of The Times

Kim Stockwood — She’s Not In Love

Luther Ingram – If lovin you is wrong I don’t wanna be right

Chilliwack – My Girl

Lavern Baker – I Cried a Tear

Clyde McPhatter – A Lover’s Question

Nina Gordon – Tonight And The Rest Of My Life

The Youngbloods – Statesboro Blues

Chic – Dance Dance Dance

RuPaul – Supermodel

Merle Travis – No Vacancy

Björk – Human Behavior

She wrote the songs – Golden girl

Lotti Golden is a cult icon of the late 60s music scene. She was one of the creative women that began to demand that their share of the spotlight shine on the unique perspective of women, not just on women’s voices singing men’s words. I found her in my early 20s when I ended up with a record someone gave me. That record is lost. Sadly, she isn’t on iTunes (unless I’m doing something wrong) so she won’t be found by another generation of women. As my favour to you, I’m going to share her.

From her 1969 album Motor-cycle:

Gonna Fay’s

A Lot Like Lucifer

This is also a great song, from a 1971 album:

Staircase between the floors

Or this song also from 1971:

 Sock It To Me Baby-It’s Your Thing

In the 80s she moved into writer producer roles, and co-wrote some fabulous songs.

Brenda K. Starr ‎- Pickin’ Up Pieces

Warp 9 – Beat Wave 

Diana Ross – Dirty looks

E.G. Daily – Some People

I hope you enjoyed this little intro to an artist that isn’t in the spotlight anymore. See if you can find her music elsewhere. I know I’m going to keep looking for her in discount LP bins every chance I get. 

Songs worth remembering

There are many songs about war and peace. We’ve been singing about those two conflicting states since the dawn of time. 

November 11 is Remembrance Day.  In honour of that day, here are eleven of my favourites.

 

  1. Billy Bragg – Between The Wars
  2. Bobby Darin – Simple Song of Freedom
  3. Jackson Browne – The Drums Of War
  4. Paper Lace – Billy don’t be a Hero
  5. Barry McGuire – Eve of Destruction
  6. Pink Floyd – The Gunner’s Dream
  7. Bob Dylan – Blowing In The Wind
  8. George Harrison – Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth)
  9. Queen – Hammer To Fall
  10. The Jam – Little Boy Soldiers
  11. The Original Caste – One Tin Soldier 

Baroque November

I have no formal education in music, just a keen interest. Anything I know about classical music I have gleaned myself over time.

The Baroque era was an early part of that self-lead discovery. Many works of classical music that I encountered early in my adulthood came out of the Late Baroque period.

The Baroque was both a long and significant era in western music.

It’s broken into three parts, conveniently named early (1550–99), middle (1600–49), and late (1650–99), with 50 transitional years on either end to stretch the entire era to 250 years. Modern composition styles that many would most easily identify as classical music, like the concerto, sonata, and symphony, originate in this period. Given the length and influence, I feel like the Baroque deserves it’s own blog series, separate from other classical music.

Below are some November born or baptized Baroque era composers whose works I’ve come across.

EARLY

Francesco Usper (real name Spongia or Sponga)

John Danyel (or John Daniel)

Samuel Scheidt

Tarquinio Merula

François Couperin, engraving by Jean Jacques Flipart.

MIDDLE

Chiara Margarita Cozzolani

Jean-Baptiste Lully (born Giovanni Battista Lulli)

Nicolaus Adam Strungk

Andreas Werckmeister

LATE

Friedrich Wilhelm Zachow (or Zachau)

Johann (Johannes) Speth

Attilio Ariosti (or Frate Ottavio)

François Couperin

Pierre Dumage (du Mage)

Jean-Baptiste Loeillet

Jean Baptiste Senaillé

Jan Josef Ignác Brentner (surname also spelled Brenntner, Brendner, Brendtner, or Prentner)

François Colin de Blamont

Charles Theodore Pachelbel (baptized Carl Theodorus, also spelled Karl Theodor)

Andrea Zani

Jan Zach (also called Johann Zach)

 

Halloween sing-a-long

I don’t think it would be right to pass through October without a hat tip to songs with a Halloween theme.  Here are 40 of them. You have a week to add more or weed out the ones you don’t like. 

  1. Bobby PickettMonsteMash
  2. David BowieScarMonsters
  3. Vincent Price does The MonsteMash
  4. Cheap TrickWoke up with Monster
  5. New York DollsFrankenstein
  6. Edgar Winter – Frankenstein
  7. Lenny KravitzFrankenstein
  8. Annie Lennox – Love Song For A Vampire
  9. Rob ZombieDragula
  10. Warren ZevonWerewolves of London
  11. Guess WhoClap For The Wolfman
  12. EaglesWitchy woman
  13. DonovanSeason of the Witch
  14. SantanaBlack Magic Woman
  15. Frank SinatraWitchcraft
  16. Panic! at the DiscoNearly Witches (Ever Since We Met…)
  17. The SpecialsGhost Town
  18. Johnny Cash – Ghost Riders in the Sky
  19. Indigo GirlsGhost
  20. GhostBusters Theme Song
  21. Rush –  Ghost of chance
  22. RadioheadGive up the Ghost
  23. Simply RedGhost Of Love
  24. Don McLeanSuperman’s Ghost
  25. Bruce Springsteen w.Tom MorelloGhost of Tom Joad
  26. Oingo BoingoDead Man’s Party
  27. Jan and DeanDead Man’s Curve
  28. U2Wake Up Dead Man
  29. BauhausBela Lugosi’s Dead
  30. King CrimsonOne More Red Nightmare
  31. DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh PrinceNightmare On My Street
  32. Alice CooperWelcome to My Nightmare
  33. Meat LoafBat Out of Hell
  34. The White StripesCatch Hell Blues
  35. Tom WaitsHell Broke Luce
  36. Pat BenatarHell Is for Children
  37. Jimi HendrixVoodoo Child
  38. Blue Oyster Cult(Don’t Fear) The Reaper
  39. RamonesPet Sematary
  40. Michael JacksonThriller

She wrote the songs – Moy Motown

It can be so hard to find information about women in music. Unless it’s made explicit, cultural assumptions have tended to credited the creation of music to men. Women are more likely to be given credit performing music than creating it. If you look hard enough though, there are women behind some of the most powerful and enduring popular music.

That’s the case with Sylvia Moy. She was an American songwriter and record producer, most famously associated with Motown Records. It’s hard to imagine some high profile Motown artists without her.

(source)

Take Stevie Wonder for example:

Or Martha and the Vandellas:

Or Marvin Gaye:

And maybe you haven’t heard of The Velvelettes, but you need to hear them now:

 

 

Baroque October

I have no formal education in music, just a keen interest. Anything I know about classical music I have gleaned myself over time.

The Baroque era was an early part of that self-lead discovery. Many works of classical music that I encountered early in my adulthood came out of the Late Baroque period.

The Baroque was both a long and significant era in western music.

It’s broken into three parts, conveniently named early (1550–99), middle (1600–49), and late (1650–99), with 50 transitional years on either end to stretch the entire era to 250 years. Modern composition styles that many would most easily identify as classical music, like the concerto, sonata, and symphony, originate in this period. Given the length and influence, I feel like the Baroque deserves it’s own blog series, separate from other classical music.

Below are some September born Baroque era composers whose works I’ve come across.

EARLY

Giulio Caccini (1551–1618)

Heinrich Schütz (1585–1672)

Domenico Scarlatti -portrait by Domingo Antonio Velasco

Étienne Moulinié (1599–1676)

Hans Leo Hassler (1564–1612)

MIDDLE

Sebastian Anton Scherer (1631–1712)

LATE

František Tůma (1704–1774)

Antoine Dauvergne (1713–1797)

Johann Nicolaus Bach (1669–1753)

Sylvius Leopold Weiss (1687–1750)

Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679–1745)

Pierre van Maldere (1729–1768)

Domenico Zipoli (1688–1726)

Baldassare Galuppi (1706–1785)

Domenico Scarlatti (1685–1757)

Johan Helmich Roman (1694–1758)

Johann Gottlieb Graun (1703–1771)

Šimon Brixi (1693–1735)

September earworm roundup

I wake up almost every morning with an earworm. Some fade quickly, other last for days. Sometimes they make me happy, sometimes they make me doubt my own sanity. They come from all genres. I can rarely know what triggers them. The only thing I do know and that they do without fail is reinforce my belief that all music is connected and good music never goes out of style.

Here’s a roundup of my September earworms.

Gloria Estefan – Rhythm Is Gonna Get You

Boxcar Willie – Wabash Cannonball

Bee Gees – How can you mend a broken heart

The Impressions – It’s All Right

Billy Preston – Nothing From Nothing

Electric Light Orchestra – Don’t Bring Me Down

En Vogue – Free Your Mind

Grand Funk Railroad – We’re An American Band

Gladys Knight & The Pips – Midnight Train To Georgia

The Byrds – Ballad of Easy Rider

Sunnyland Slim – Be Careful How You Vote

Tommy Overstreet – Send Me No Roses

CeCe Peniston – Finally

The Marmalade – Reflections Of My Life

Loudon Wainwright III – Dead Skunk in the Middle of the Road

Jimmy Reed – Ain’t That Lovin’ You Baby

Dee Dee Sharp – Never Pick A Pretty Boy

Pink Floyd – Hey You”

P!nk – F**kin’ Perfect

Mel McDaniel – Baby’s Got Her BlueJeans On

Little Milton – Grits Ain’t Groceries

Pretenders – Don’t Get Me Wrong

Jimmie Rodgers – Waiting for a Train

Don Walser – Rolling Stone From Texas

Was (Not Was) – Walk The Dinosaur

The CARS – Let’s go!

Frankie Lymon+The Teenagers – Why Do Fools Fall In Love 

Freddy Weller – Games People Play

The Pretty Things – Don’t Bring Me Down 

George Jones & Tammy Wynette – We Gonna Hold On

 

 

 

This is an aside and not a September earworm, but it came up right after that last video. Watch the body language when George uses Tammy’s name in the song. Brutal. I hope nobody ever makes me sing a duet with my ex.