Baroque October

I have no formal education in music, just a keen interest. Anything I know about classical music I have gleaned myself over time.

The Baroque era was an early part of that self-lead discovery. Many works of classical music that I encountered early in my adulthood came out of the Late Baroque period.

The Baroque was both a long and significant era in western music.

It’s broken into three parts, conveniently named early (1550–99), middle (1600–49), and late (1650–99), with 50 transitional years on either end to stretch the entire era to 250 years. Modern composition styles that many would most easily identify as classical music, like the concerto, sonata, and symphony, originate in this period. Given the length and influence, I feel like the Baroque deserves it’s own blog series, separate from other classical music.

Below are some September born Baroque era composers whose works I’ve come across.

EARLY

Giulio Caccini (1551–1618)

Heinrich Schütz (1585–1672)

Domenico Scarlatti -portrait by Domingo Antonio Velasco

Étienne Moulinié (1599–1676)

Hans Leo Hassler (1564–1612)

MIDDLE

Sebastian Anton Scherer (1631–1712)

LATE

František Tůma (1704–1774)

Antoine Dauvergne (1713–1797)

Johann Nicolaus Bach (1669–1753)

Sylvius Leopold Weiss (1687–1750)

Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679–1745)

Pierre van Maldere (1729–1768)

Domenico Zipoli (1688–1726)

Baldassare Galuppi (1706–1785)

Domenico Scarlatti (1685–1757)

Johan Helmich Roman (1694–1758)

Johann Gottlieb Graun (1703–1771)

Šimon Brixi (1693–1735)

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Women classical composers – the July edition

As is the case with all too many things historical, the talent of women composers is underrepresented in the genre of classical music. In spite of the odds being against them women wrote, and continue to write, exceptional classical music that can be enjoyed today. They deserve more exposure, so it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are some female classical composers whose works I have encountered, with links to music samples for each of them.

 

Ruth Crawford Seeger

1) Ruth Crawford Seeger (July 3, 1901 – Nov 18, 1953) (née Ruth Porter Crawford) was a modernist composer and later composed folk music.

 

 

 

 

Pauline Viardot

2) Pauline Viardot (July 18, 1821 – May 18, 1910) (née García)  was a soprano who began composing when she was young.

 

 

 

 

3) Marianna Auenbrugger (July 19, 1759 – Aug 25, 1782) was a well regarded Viennese pianist and composer.

 

 

Sophie Menter, painted by Ilya Repin.

4) Sophie Menter (July 29, 1846 — Feb 23, 1918) was a piano virtuoso and composer.

 

 

 

5) Suzanne Giraud (born 31 July 1958) is a contemporary French composer.

 

 

Sansan Chien, photo by
Wen-Chung Chiang

6) Sansan Chien (July 1, 1967 – Oct 24, 2011) Taiwanese composer. (I used google translate for the song titles so if they’re not perfect I apologize)

 

 

7) Julia Tsenova (July 30, 1948 – April 11, 2010) was a Bulgarian pianist and composer. 

 

 

 

Women classical composers – the May edition

As is the case with all too many things historical, the talent of women composers is underrepresented in the genre of classical music. In spite of the odds being against them women wrote, and continue to write, exceptional classical music that can be enjoyed today. They deserve more exposure, so it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are five female classical composers whose works I enjoy, with links to songs for each of them.

 

Julia Ward Howe

Julia Ward Howe (May 27, 1819 – October 17, 1910) was an all-round super woman, an author, poet abolitionist, social activist, and suffragist.

 

Anne Dudley (born May 7) was the first BBC Concert Orchestra‘s Composer in Association.

 

Debbie Wiseman (born May 10) composes for film and tv.

 

Maria Theresia Paradis

Judith Weir (born May 11) writes operas.

 

Maria Theresia von Paradis (May 15, 1759 – February 1, 1824) may have been Mozart’s inspiration for his Piano Concerto No. 18 in B flat major.

 

 

 

Classical composers – the May edition

I have broad, perhaps somewhat eclectic taste in music. This is by accident rather than design. Most of the genres outside what gets airplay on popular radio I have luckily stumbled upon while on other paths. Our culture doesn’t really expose young people en masse to much more than current popular music, and that’s a shame. I feel like it’s a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are links to 31 works of classical music by composers you’ll find on my iPod, and two links to works by composers most of us would know – all artists born in May, whose works I have enjoyed.

Richard Wagner

Johannes Brahms  

Richard Wagner 

Gabriel Fauré 

Erik Satie 

  1. Hugo Alfvén 
  2. Jean-Baptiste Barrière
  3. Ludwig August Lebrun
  4. Hans Christian Lumbye 
  5. Jean-Frédéric Edelmann 
  6. Carl Stamitz 
  7. Louis Moreau Gottschalk 
  8. Giovanni Paisiello 
  9. Julius Röntgen
  10. Jan van Gilse
  11. William Grant Still

    Joseph Marx

  12. William Grant Still
  13. Josip Štolcer-Slavenski
  14. Johann Baptist Wanhal 
  15. Franz Anton Hoffmeister 
  16. Giovanni Battista Viotti 
  17. Adolf von Henselt 
  18. Otto Klemperer
  19. Boris Parsadanian 
  20. Andrei Eshpai 
  21. Francesco Pasquale Ricci 
  22. Otto Klemperer

    Werner Egk 

  23. Jean Cras 
  24. Andrea Luchesi 
  25. Ignaz Moscheles 
  26. Józef Wieniawski 
  27. Jean Françaix
  28. Paul Paray 
  29. Claude Champagne 
  30. Isaac Albéniz 
  31. Alfredo Antonini

Women classical composers – the April Edition

As is the case with all too many things historical, the talent of women composers is underrepresented in the genre of classical music. In spite of the odds being against them women wrote, and continue to write, exceptional classical music that can be enjoyed today. They deserve more exposure, so it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are four female classical composers whose works I enjoy, with links to songs for each of them.

 

Elisabetta Brusa (April 3, 1954) is an Italian composer. She started writing piano pieces as a child.

 

Germaine Tailleferre (image source)

Germaine Tailleferre (April 19, 1892 – November 7, 1983) was a French composer and the only female member of the group of composers known as Les Six.

 

 

 

 

Ethel Smyth (image source)

Dame Ethel Mary Smyth (April 23, 1858 – May 8, 1944) was an English composer and suffragist. Her father was very opposed to her making a career in music.

 

 

 

 

 

Luise Adolpha Le Beau (April 25, 1850 – July 17, 1927) took piano lessons with one of my favourite female pianist and composers, Clara Schumann.

Luise Adolpha Le Beau (image source)

 

 

 

Women classical composers – the March edition

As is the case with all too many things historical, the talent of women composers is underrepresented in the genre of classical music. In spite of the odds being against them women wrote, and continue to write, exceptional classical music that can be enjoyed today. They deserve more exposure, so it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are four female classical composers whose works I enjoy, with links to songs for each of them.

margaret_bondsMargaret Bonds (March 3, 1913 – April 26, 1972) was an African American composer and pianist. She is remembered for working with one of my favourite poets, Langston Hughes.

 

 

 

 

Jean Coulthard
Jean Coulthard

Jean Coulthard (February 10, 1908 – March 9, 2000) was a Canadian composer and part of a trio of women composers that included Barbara Pentland and Violet Archer.

 

 

 

Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre
Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre

Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre (March 17, 1665 – June 27, 1729) was a well known French harpsichordist and composer in her time.

 

 

 

Els Aarne (March 30, 1917 – June 14, 1995) was an Estonian composer and pedagogue.

Classical Composers – the March edition

I have broad, perhaps somewhat eclectic taste in music. This is by accident rather than design. Most of the genres outside what gets airplay on popular radio I have luckily stumbled upon while on other paths. Our culture doesn’t really expose young people en masse to much more than current popular music, and that’s a shame. I feel like it’s a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are links to 31 works of classical music composed by artists born in March whose works I have enjoyed – one for each day of the month, plus links to other widely known composers and/or widely known compositions.

Portrait of J S Bach by E. G. Haussmann,
Portrait of J S Bach by E. G. Haussmann

You know their names:

You’ll recognize these tunes:

Thirty-one classical composers born in the month of March:

  1. Eugen Doga

    Karol Kurpiński
    Karol Kurpiński
  2. Alexander Goedicke 
  3. Paul Bazelaire
  4. Carlos Surinach
  5. Wibi Soerjadi
  6. Christoph Ernst Friedrich Weyse
  7. Heitor Villa-Lobos
  8. Karol Kurpiński
  9. Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
  10. Alan Hovhaness
  11. Josef Mysliveček

    Canadian composer Harry Somers
    Canadian composer Harry Somers
  12. Harry Somers 
  13. Pablo de Sarasate
  14. Ludwig Minkus 
  15. Aldemaro Romero
  16. Michel Blavet
  17. Hugo Wolf 
  18. Enrico Toselli 
  19. Pancho Vladigerov
  20. Ulvi Cemal Erkin
  21. Eduard Strauss
  22. Karl Davydov
  23. Johan Halvorsen

    Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky
    Modest Petrovich Mussorgsky
  24. Josef Rheinberger
  25. Gian Francesco Malipiero
  26. Fredrik Pacius
  27. Modest Mussorgsky
  28. Dimitrie Cuclin
  29. Mykola Lysenko
  30. Johannes Matthias Sperger
  31. Johann Wilhelm Hässler 

 

 

 

 

Women classical composers – the February edition

Like most things historical, women have been underrepresented in the genre of classical music. In spite of the odds being against them, women wrote, and continue to write, exceptional classical music that can be enjoyed today. They deserve more exposure. So it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are 5 female classical composers whose works I have on my iPod right now, with links to songs for each of them.

 

Grażyna Bacewicz
Grażyna Bacewicz

Grażyna Bacewicz (Feb 5, 1909) was a respected composer and violinist from with a Lithuanian father and Polish mother, and she chose to identify as Polish. She lived in Warsaw during the second world war and gave secret concerts.

 

 

Miina Härma
Miina Härma

Miina Härma (Feb 9, 1864) was a well known Estonian composer. She composed mostly vocal work.

 

 

 

 

Adela Verne
Adela Verne

Adela Verne (Feb 27 1877) was among the greatest woman pianists of her era and a composer. 

 

 

Pía Sebastiani
Pía Sebastiani

Pía Sebastiani (Feb 27, 1925) was a pianist and composer from Argentina. I can’t find any video or audio of her own compositions that I can link here, but I did find a video about her and you can find a few recordings of other composers works in iTunes.

 

 

 

 

Eugenia Manolidou (or Manolides) (Feb 27, 1975) is a current Greek composer.

Hymn To The Moon 

 

Classical composers – the February edition

I have broad, perhaps somewhat eclectic taste in music. This is by accident rather than design. Most of the genres outside what gets airplay on popular radio I have stumbled upon while on other paths. Our culture doesn’t really expose young people en masse to much more than current popular music. And that’s a shame. So it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are links to 28 works of classical music composed by artists born in February whose works I have enjoyed – one for each day of the month.

 

Portrait of Felix Mendelssohn by the English miniaturist James Warren Childe
Portrait of Felix Mendelssohn by James Warren Childe

Emil Hartmann (Feb 1, 1836)  

Felix Mendelssohn (Feb 3, 1809)

Johann Georg Albrechtsberger (Feb 3, 1736)  

Émile Prudent (Feb 3, 1817)   

Ole Bornemann Bull (Feb 5, 1810)  

Wilhelm Stenhammar (Feb 7, 1871)  

Joseph Leopold Eybler (Feb 8, 1765)  

Henri-Joseph Rigel (Feb 9, 1741)    

Alban Berg (Feb 9, 1885)    

Hans Bronsart von Schellendorf (Feb 11, 1830)   

Jan Ladislav Dussek (Feb 12, 1760)    

French violinist Pierre Rode
French violinist Pierre Rode

Roy Harris (Feb 12, 1898)   

Leopold Godowsky (Feb 13, 1870)  

Robert Fuchs (Feb 15, 1847)   

Joseph Willcox Jenkins (Feb 15, 1928)    

Pierre Rode (Feb 16, 1774) 

John Corigliano (Feb 16, 1938)  

Henri Vieuxtemps (Feb 17, 1820)   

Leevi Madetoja (Feb 17, 1887)    

Johann Christian Kittel (Feb 18, 1732)     

Pencil drawing of Luigi Boccherini by Etienne Mazas
Pencil drawing of Luigi Boccherini by Etienne Mazas

André Mathieu (Feb 18, 1929)    

Luigi Boccherini (Feb 19, 1743)   

Charles Auguste de Bériot (Feb 20, 1802)  

Carl Czerny (Feb 21, 1791)   

Frank Bridge (Feb 26, 1879)   

Hubert Parry (Feb 27, 1848)   

Wilhelm Peterson-Berger (Feb 27, 1867)     

Artur Kapp (Feb 28, 1878)   

 

Women classical composers – the January edition

Like most things historical, women are underrepresented in the genre of classical music. In spite of the odds being against them, a few women wrote some exceptional classical music that survives to the present day. They deserve more exposure. So it feels like a good idea to do my bit to mitigate our cultural musical myopia.

Below are some female classical composers I have on my iPod right now, with song links for each.

 

Ester Mägi (image source)
Ester Mägi
(image source)

Ester Mägi (Jan 10, 1922)

Her work is work has been inspired by folk music from her home country of Estonia.

Piano Concerto (1953)

Symphony No. 1 (1968)

 

 

 

 

Vítězslava Kaprálová in 1935.
Vítězslava Kaprálová in 1935. (image source)

 

Vítězslava Kaprálová (Jan 24, 1915)

She died at 25, just after having married.

Piano Concerto (1935)

Dubnová preludia (April preludes) op.13 (1937)